Thursday, July 7, 2011

Working In Molds - Part Two

 Over the course of two days I filled this mold with Envirotex Lite.  In part one of this tutorial I explained why.
Working in a mold is different because everything is backwards.  This last "to the brim" pour will become the back of the mold.  So I don't have to worry about bubbles as much as I do when I am working in a bezel.  
Below are all the molds I made.  I still have to do some sanding on the edges, but I did want to show you my results and tell you what I embedded in each shape.

Row 1 - Crochet sample, yarn, mica flakes
Row 2 - Dried flower, vintage rhinestone strip, brass charm and rhinestone component
Row 3 - tiny rocks, shells and glass beads, gold foil
Row 4 - plastic dice, plastic toy family, watch parts
Row 5 - wood beads, glass crystals
Row 6 - sequins and beads, computer parts
Row 7 - toy car, glass beads, wood bug
Row 8 - orange beads, tiny bisque doll, sequins and beads

13 comments:

  1. they look wonderful, now do you just drill a hole for a jumpring or bail? Can one be added in the pouring process?
    take care & i love the tips ttfn Lana :)

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  2. Fantastic information! Thank you Carmi!
    Take care,
    Lisa

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  3. I will definitely use both techniques. When there is room I will drill a hole (you can use a hand drill) and if the embedded objects occupy the whole mold shape (like the shells sample) I will glue a bail to the back instead.

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  4. What material is the mold made of? Could you use the material that holds store bought cookies, for example. How about the silicon molds from the baking aisle? I love your "beads"! Can't wait to see what you make out of them.

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  5. The molds are made with re-usable polypropylene.
    I use the baking silicone molds too! I have not tried anything else other than the molds I make myself with Environmental Technology Inc. Mold Making products.

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  6. Wow! I am learning so much from your blog. Thanks for sharing with me the "newbie".

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  7. Do the molds require a mold release?

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  8. It is definitely a lot easier to pop these out if you use the mold release. I tested it without to see how it would go...and while it was super finicky, as you can see, I got them all out.

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  9. I like them all, but the one with mica flecks is just stunning!

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  10. These are great - love the texture of the one with glass beads. Which craft stores stock the supplies again?

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  11. Your resin jewellery looks fantastic. Superb blog x

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  12. So do you not worry about the bubbles that might form on the top of the finished jewel? I love all the different objects. thank you for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. I try not to obsess too much...unless a bubble covers something important. In molds like this they are not very noticeable.

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